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Religion and Alcoholism

  • Richard Stivers

Abstract

Alcoholism is as rare in primitive societies as drunkenness is common (Mandelbaum, 1965; Marshall, 1979). Anthropologists often account for this paradox in terms of the cultural integration of drunkenness. It would appear that drunkenness, but not alcoholism, receives moral and religious approval.

Keywords

Modern Society Alcoholic Beverage Problem Drinking Drinking Pattern Traditional Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Stivers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social WorkIllinois State UniversityNormalUSA

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