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Techniques of Somatic Cell Hybridization by Fusion of Protoplasts

  • Horst Binding
  • Reinhard Nehls

Abstract

Somatic cell hybridization in higher plants has been developed to the point where it is a reliable technique for the formation of cell clones with recombinant genetic information of even far removed taxa (e.g., Kao, 1977; Binding and Nehls, 1978). Recombinant plants have only been obtained in related taxa, namely in the genus Nicotiana and other members of the Solanaceae family at high yields, in Arabidopsis + Brassica (Gleba and Hoffmann, 1979), Daucus + Aegopodium (Dudits et al., 1979), and within the genus Daucus (Dudits et al., 1977).

Keywords

Cell Suspension Culture Somatic Hybrid Protoplast Fusion Fusion Product Mesophyll Protoplast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horst Binding
    • 1
  • Reinhard Nehls
    • 1
  1. 1.Botanisches InstitutChristian-Albrechts-UniversitätKielFederal Republic of Germany

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