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Experimental Atherosclerosis: Diet and Drugs

  • David Kritchevsky
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 51)

Abstract

The earliest studies of induced atherosclerosis involved the feeding of milk and eggs (1) or of pure cholesterol to rabbits (2). The choice of the rabbit for this type of study has been criticized on the grounds that this species is normally herbiverous and thus we are studying a cholesterol storage disease in an animal that cannot detoxify excess cholesterol. The criticism is justifiable but, in fact, any animal species used differs metabolically from man to some extent. While direct extrapolation of animal data to man is generally unwarranted these experiments provide clues which may be useful in assessing dietary or drug treatment.

Keywords

Vegetable Protein Elaidic Acid Estradiol Benzoate Experimental Atherosclerosis Cebus Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Kritchevsky
    • 1
  1. 1.The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and BiologyPhiladelphiaUSA

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