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Thermal Conductivity, Diffusivity and Expansion of Avery Island Salt at Pressure and Temperature

  • W. B. Durham
  • A. E. Abey
  • D. A. Trimmer

Abstract

Preliminary data on the thermal properties of a coarse-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicate that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7 W/mK and 3.6 × 10−6 m2/s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573 K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 × 10−5/K at 300 K to 5.5 × 10−5/K at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt.

Keywords

Thermal Conductivity Rock Salt Line Source Linear Expansion Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Purdue Research Foundation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. B. Durham
    • 1
  • A. E. Abey
    • 1
  • D. A. Trimmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA

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