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Glutamine: A New Metabolic Substrate

  • R. M. Biltz
  • J. M. Letteri
  • E. D. Pellegrino
  • L. Pinkus
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 151)

Abstract

Glutamine serves important metabolic functions in a variety of tissues, but it has only recently been recognized as a new component of the metabolism of bone-Glutamine and glutamate are present as free amino acids in bone water at concentrations 2.5 and 40 times greater than their respective concentrations in plasma. The mediated transport of glutamine into calvaria occurs almost exclusively by Na+-dependent system(s). Glutamine uptake is not inhibited by N-methyl-D-L-alanine or 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid which are inhibitors of the A system of transport. Calvaria, when incubated in vitro degrade significant amounts of glutamine to ammonia, glutamate, other amino acids (alanine, aspartate, proline, ornithine) and CO2. The purpose of this report is to further delineate several of these processes with a view to their possible physiological significances.

Keywords

Ammonia Production Glutamine Concentration Isobutyric Acid Amino Acid Transport System Glutamine Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Biltz, R.M., Letteri, J.M., Pellegrino, E.D., Palekar, A., and Pinkus, L.M. Mineral and Electrolyte Metabolism (in press).Google Scholar
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    Bergmeyer, H.U., in “Methods of Enzymatic Analysis,” Acad. Press, New York (1965).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Biltz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. M. Letteri
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. D. Pellegrino
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. Pinkus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineNassau County Medical CenterEast MeadowUSA
  2. 2.The Catholic University of AmericaUSA
  3. 3.S.U.N.Y.Stony BrookUSA

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