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Regulation of Phosphate Excretion by the Diseased Kidney: The Intrinsic Proximal Tubular Adaptation

  • Norimoto Yanagawa
  • Patty Yeung
  • Walter Trizna
  • Leon G. Fine
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 151)

Abstract

The maintenance of phosphate homeostasis in chronic renal failure has been ascribed to PTH-dependent1–4 and PTH-independent mechanisms5–9. While the phosphaturic effect of elevated PTH levels undoubtedly plays an important role in modulating tubular phosphate reabsorption as nephrons are progressively destroyed, there is equally impressive evidence that intrinsic adaptations in tubular transport may occur independently of biologically active PTH levels. Such adaptations would include changes in the basal rate of phosphate transport and in the sensitivity and responsiveness of the renal tubule to PTH.

Keywords

Phosphate Excretion Dibutyryl cAMP Remnant Kidney Proximal Straight Tubule Phosphate Flux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norimoto Yanagawa
    • 1
  • Patty Yeung
    • 1
  • Walter Trizna
    • 1
  • Leon G. Fine
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Center for the Health SciencesUCLA School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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