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Measurement of Intracellular Inorganic Phosphate in Human Blood Red Cells, Leucocytes and Platelets

  • A. Noorwali
  • C. J. Preston
  • A. Challa
  • R. G. G. Russell
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 151)

Abstract

Inorganic phosphate (Pi) has long been known to play an important role in biological systems. It is essential for structural integrity of cells, for example, as a constituent of membrane phospholipids. It is also involved in a host of anabolic and catabolic processes. In glycolysis, Pi participates in the degradation of glucose and synthesis of ATP. Pi has an important role in the regulation of the activity of many enzyme systems involved in energy-transforming reactions. In erythrocytes, through its regulation of the levels of 2,3-DPG (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and ATP, Pi is indirectly involved in the delivery of oxygen to tissues (1). In urine, Pi is the major buffer system. In hypophosphatemic states, phosphate deficiency leads to many metabolic disturbances, including myopathy, haemolysis and impaired phagocytosis (2).

Keywords

High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Particulate Fraction Electron Dense Granule Dihydrogen Orthophosphate High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    M.A. Lichtman, D.R. Miller, J. Cohen et al: Reduced red cell glycolysis, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate concentration, and increased hemoglobin oxygen affinity caused by hypophosphatemia. Ann.Intern.Med. 74: 562–568, 1971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Noorwali
    • 1
  • C. J. Preston
    • 1
  • A. Challa
    • 1
  • R. G. G. Russell
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Human Metabolism & Clinical BiochemistryUniversity of Sheffield Medical SchoolSheffieldUK

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