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Mutagenic and Developmental Effects of Microwave Radiofrequency (MW/RF) Energies

  • Sol M. Michaelson
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 49)

Abstract

Some investigators have reported chromosomal changes in various plant and animal cells and tissue cultures exposed to MW/RF energies. Other investigators have reported no changes. Reported chromosomal changes include structural aberrations, polyploidy and stickiness.

Keywords

Power Density Microwave Radiation Microwave Energy RADIOFREQUENCY Energy Microwave Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sol M. Michaelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiation Biology and BiophysicsUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochesterUSA

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