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The Systematic Remediation of Specific Disorders: Selected Application of Methods Derived in a Clinical Research Setting

  • Eugene B. Piasetsky
  • Yehuda Ben-Yishay
  • Joseph Weinberg
  • Leonard Diller

Abstract

The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to maximize the patient’s ability to function within a normal environment. Cognitive rehabilitation is a major component of this effort. Among the many disabilities which may befall an individual, disturbances in thinking, perceiving and acting are among the most confining. Research in cognitive rehabilitation may be seen as addressing these problems at two levels: 1) seeking methods by which to remediate primary cognitive domains so as to promote the broadest basis for independent functioning; and, 2) seeking methods by which to remediate the functional foundations of important activities of everyday life so as to enhance the individual’s sense of personal satisfaction and allow him to experience a productive lifestyle. As scientists, we are inexorably drawn to seek out, understand and influence the primary processes which govern human behavior. As clinicians, we are governed by the mandate to apply our knowledge in order to best serve our patient’s needs. These seemingly obliquely related directives, when blended together, form the logic underlying a unified research effort. The two training programs I will be describing illustrate this point. They represent diverse orientations to the problem of cognitive rehabilitation, owing, in large part, to the unique characteristics

Keywords

Colored Light Brain Damage Specific Disorder Cognitive Rehabilitation Shoulder Blade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene B. Piasetsky
    • 1
  • Yehuda Ben-Yishay
    • 1
  • Joseph Weinberg
    • 1
  • Leonard Diller
    • 1
  1. 1.The Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine N.Y.U. Medical CenterN.Y.USA

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