An Attempt to Localize the Pre-Excitation Site in Wolff-Parkinson-White Patients by Means of a Mathematical Model

  • E. Macchi
  • L. Guerri
  • B. Taccardi
  • V. Bonatti
  • A. Rolli
  • G. Botti

Abstract

Normal conduction of excitation between the atria and the ventricles takes place through the atrio-ventricular (A-V) node, the His bundle and its branches in approximately 80 msec. In the Wolff-Parkinson-White (W.P.W.) syndrome the excitatory process reaches the ventricular myocardium earlier than normal (pre-excitation) through an anomalous conducting bundle which bypasses the A-V node somewhere along the fibrous rings (Kent bundles) or emerges from the His bundle or the initial portions of the bundle branches (Mahaim fibers). Accordingly, pre-excitation spreads to the ventricles at different sites in individual patients, thus bringing about different potential patterns at the body surface. Since excitation spreads also through the normal pathways, a mixed beat occurs.

Keywords

Mold Rubber Assure Fibril Verse 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Macchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Guerri
    • 3
  • B. Taccardi
    • 4
  • V. Bonatti
    • 5
  • A. Rolli
    • 5
  • G. Botti
    • 5
  1. 1.Istituto di MatematicaUniversità di ParmaItaly
  2. 2.Istituto per le Applicazioni del CalcoloC.N.R.RomaItaly
  3. 3.Istituto di Analisi NumericaC.N.R.PaviaItaly
  4. 4.Istituto di Fisiologia Generale e Centro SIMESUniversità di ParmaItaly
  5. 5.Divisione di CardiologiaOspedale MaggioreParmaItaly

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