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Exercise Electrocardiography and Monitoring of Myocardial Infarction with a Clinical Mapping System

  • R. Hinsen
  • J. Silny
  • G. Rau
  • R. v. Essen
  • W. Merx
  • S. Effert

Abstract

Multiple thoracic leads supply more electrical information about the cardiac electric field than the standard ECG-leads (Taccardi, 1963; Kornreich, 1973; Abildskov et al., 1977). It has been shown in several studies, that this additional information can be used to increase sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of heart diseases , for example myocardial infarction and WPW syndrome CFlowers et al., 1976; Vincent et al., 1977; Yamada et al., 1975; de Ambroggi et al., 1976). Lead systems with up to 256 thoracic electrodes have been used to register a maximal information content. First computerized mapping systems have been developed to manage the immense data streams that are combined with the acquisition of multiple ECG signals (Cottini et al., 1972; Wyatt and Lux, 1974; Tiberghien et al., 19 76). Investigations under laboratory environment conditions could be performed with these systems but the most clinical studies, especially with seriously ill patients in the coronary care units were impossible. Prior needed conditions for the widespread application of body surface mapping are small mapping systems for clinical routine use, which are self contained, mobile and easy to operate. Such systems will allow comprehensive studies with large numbers of normal and abnormal maps. This clinical experience is necessary to evaluate the diagnostic importance of the additional electrical information in the maps.

Keywords

Lead System Direct Memory Access Floppy Disk Exercise Electrocardiography Heart Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hinsen
    • 1
  • J. Silny
    • 1
  • G. Rau
    • 1
  • R. v. Essen
    • 1
  • W. Merx
    • 1
  • S. Effert
    • 1
  1. 1.Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Department of Internal Medicine IRWTHAachenGermany

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