Advertisement

Liposomes and the Reticuloendothelial System: Interactions of Liposomes with Macrophages and Behavior of Liposomes In Vivo

  • R. L. Juliano
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 47)

Abstract

Liposomes represent an attractive approach to the problem of controlled drug delivery. Liposomes composed of natural body constituents are biodegradable, very weakly immunogenic and possess limited intrinsic toxicity. A great number of drugs and macromolecules can be readily encapsulated within liposomes of various types using relatively simple and efficient procedures. Incorporation of a drug within liposomes produces drastic but predictable changes in the pharmacodynamic behaviour of the substance. Current approaches to the exploitation of liposomal delivery systems have been reviewed elsewhere (Juliano, 1981, 1980; Ryman this volume, Mayhew this volume).

Keywords

Reticuloendothelial System Cytosine Arabinoside Latex Bead Mouse Peritoneal Macrophage Large Unilamellar Vesicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Juliano, R.L., 1980, “Drug Delivery Systems: Characteristics and Biomedical Applications,” Oxford Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Juliano, R.L., 1981, Liposomes as a drug delivery system, Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, 2: 39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Juliano, R.L. and Lin, G., 1980, The interaction of plasma proteins with liposomes in: “Liposomes and Immunobiology”, B. Tom and H. Six, eds., Elsevier, North Holland, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Juliano, R.L. and McCullough, H.N., 1980, Controlled delivery of an anti-tumor drug: localized action of liposome encapsulated cytosine arabinoside administered via the respiratory system, J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 214: 381.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Juliano, R.L. and Stamp, D., 1975, Effects of particle size and charge on the clearance of lipo_somAs and liposome encapsulated drugs, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 63: 651.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Juliano, R.L. and Stamp, D., 1975, Effects of particle size and charge on the clearance of lipo_somAs and liposome encapsulated drugs, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 63: 651.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. McCullough, H.N. and Juliano, R.L., 1979, Organ selective action of an anti-tumor drug: pharmacologic studies of liposome encapsulated ß-cytosine arabinoside administered via the respiratory systerfof rats, J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 63: 727.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Pagano, R.E. and Weinstein, J., 1978, Interactions of phospholipids vesicles with mammalian cells, Ann. Rev. Biophys. Bioeng., 7: 435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Saba, T.M., 1970, Physiology and pathophysiology of the reticuloendothelial system, Arch. Int. Med., 126: 1031.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Saba, T.M., Blumenstock, F.A., Weber, P. and Kaplan, J.E., 1978, a-opsonic glycoprotein, N.Y. Acad. Sci., 312: 43.Google Scholar
  11. Silverstein, S.C., Steinman, R.M. and Cohn, Z.A., 1977, Endocytosis, Ann. Rev. Biochem., 46: 669.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Juliano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyThe University of Texas Medical School at HoustonHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations