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Male Inexpressiveness

Behavioral Intervention
  • David A. DosserJr.

Abstract

The male sex role became an important topic of study during the 1970s and promises to be a major subject for the 1980s. This subject has been explored from the perspectives of a number of disciplines, theories, and methodological approaches.

Keywords

Irrational Belief Homework Assignment Target Person Expressive Behavior Response Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. DosserJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child Development and Family RelationsNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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