Lifelines pp 155-167 | Cite as

Nursing Issues

  • Kathy Horvath

Abstract

Nurses have unique relationships with patients as a result of their consistent availability and their specific roles and functions. They often respond to the immediate requests of hospitalized patients and spend protracted periods of time with outpatients before and after formal evaluation by a physician. The nurse is available when family, friends, and other health professionals are absent and during informal, unstructured time when the patient can speak more freely and candidly about his suicidal preoccupations. Unless the nurse can recognize suicidal behavior and cope with the feelings elicited by the patient, she* may overlook the signs of an impending suicide attempt. In addition, the nurse assesses the severity and meaning of suicidal thoughts and behaviors and responds by formulating an appropriate treatment plan. This chapter focuses on the roles and clinical responsibilities of the primary nurse in the management of the suicidal patient.

Keywords

Depression Peri Tray Sonal Alco 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy Horvath
    • 1
  1. 1.Beth Israel HospitalUSA

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