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Aggravation of Glomerulonephritis by Hypertension

  • David S. Baldwin

Abstract

An immunopathogenetic mechanism, immune complex or antiglomerular basement membrane antibody, is held responsible for most forms of primary glomerular disease in man. Although immunologic mechanisms and the mediators of glomerular damage that they induce may well form the basis initially for most glomerular diseases, certain clinical observations and experimental data suggest that the progression of these diseases is influenced by the operation of nonimmunologic factors as well. The present discussion deals with the role of intrarenal vascular disease and hypertension as mechanisms of glomerular damage.

Keywords

Glomerular Disease Glomerular Sclerosis Glomerular Damage Glomerular Capillary Pressure Primary Glomerular Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David S. Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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