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Feedback and Motor Control in Stuttering

  • Sharon R. Garber
  • Gerald M. Siegel

Abstract

For speech production to proceed smoothly, the timing and coordination of a variety of complex movement patterns must be programmed and carried out in a precise fashion. During the moment of stuttering, this process is disrupted, and the stutterer may appear to be struggling in the grip of an uncontrollable spasm or seizure. For this and other reasons, early theorists attempted to identify some underlying physical abnormality as the root cause of stuttering. The earliest programmatic research in stuttering involved comparisons of stutterers and nonstutterers on a great variety of physiological, motor, and perceptual variables. After many years of such research, the accumulated evidence was at best suggestive, and no constellation of physiological variables emerged that could unequivocally be identified with either the person who stutters or the moment of stuttering (Bloodstein, 1975).

Keywords

Speech Production Auditory Feedback Dichotic Listening Hearing Research Hearing Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon R. Garber
    • 1
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Speech and Theater ArtsUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Center for Research in Human Learning and Department of Communication DisordersUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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