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Learning and Memory Deficits in Institutionalized and Noninstitutionalized Old People

An Analysis of Interference Effects
  • Gordon Winocur
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 8)

Abstract

This chapter addresses several issues related to declining learning and memory performance in the aged. In particular, attention is focused on the role of interference, which for many years was regarded as the single most important factor underlying cognitive decline in old people. Recently, however, it has become apparent that, despite its parsimony and wide appeal, the interference hypothesis lacks a solid empirical base. Design flaws in some of the relevant studies and conflicting results in others have raised considerable doubt as to whether the aged are indeed more susceptible to interference than the young. In view of the theoretical and practical importance of this controversy, a systematic examination of interference effects was undertaken and results of this research are reported here.

Keywords

Interference Effect Memory Deficit Aged Group Hippocampal Lesion Negative Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon Winocur
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTrent UniversityPeterboroughCanada

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