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The Appearance and Disappearance of Age Differences in Adult Memory

  • Marion Perlmutter
  • David B. Mitchell
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 8)

Abstract

Over the past two decades there has been much support for the commonly held belief that memory deteriorates in later adulthood. However, there has been less progress towards understanding the basis of this decline. Moreover, under some conditions age differences have not been observed. Contrasting the situations in which deficits are and are not observed should be instructive for gaining an understanding of age-related changes in memory. The present chapter includes a presentation of some of our research in which age deficits have been observed and a discussion of how the deficits often have been attenuated and sometimes eliminated. Finally, an attempt is made to integrate these results, as well as other findings in the literature, in a way that may shed light on the mechanisms underlying memory change in adulthood.

Keywords

Free Recall Memory Test Trial Block Semantic Processing Semantic Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marion Perlmutter
    • 1
  • David B. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Child DevelopmentUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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