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Changes with Age in Problem Solving

  • David Arenberg
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 8)

Abstract

Reasoning is among the most cherished of man’s abilities. It is, however, an aspect of cognitive performance which has proved more difficult to study than several others such as intelligence, memory, and learning. As a result, the reasoning literature is more meager and less systematic than the literature in other areas; and, not surprisingly, that picture is reflected in the area of reasoning and aging as well.

Keywords

Birth Cohort Concept Problem Initial Information Conjunctive Problem Chess Player 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Arenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Gerontology Research CenterNational Institute on AgingBaltimoreUSA

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