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On the Familial Origins of Personality and Social Style

  • Michael E. Lamb

Abstract

Since Freud made his seminal contributions to the study of affective and personality development, no one has seriously challenged the notion that intrafamilial relationships have an enormous impact on psychosocial development. There remains a good deal of disagreement, however, about the nature of their influence, the mechanisms whereby these influences are mediated, and the ways in which these processes can profitably be studied. In this chapter, I plan to review the issues I believe to be most pressing and the strategies that seem most promising. My goal is to show how several rather different studies and approaches should be viewed in relation to one another, for they represent attempts on my part to examine different aspects of a common puzzle. My goal is not to present extensive and comprehensive amounts of data. Rather, I wish to sketch a perspective for the examination of family influences on infant development while also underscoring the diverse issues that should occupy our collective attention as we seek a clearer and more complete understanding of the nature and process of early personality development.

Keywords

Child Development Parental Behavior Social Competence Maternal Employment Sibling Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Lamb
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Psychiatry, and PediatricsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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