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An Integrative Model

  • R. Taylor Segraves
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

The purpose of the next three chapters is to present an integrative model for the treatment of chronic marital discord. Previous chapters have documented the absence of a comprehensive model for the conduct of marital therapy. In particular, it has been argued that the formation of theoretical schools and ideologies has hampered the clinician’s vision and range of permissible activities. Necessary linkages between alternative conceptual systems are absent and no clinically sophisticated theoretical model articulates with a data language. As stated previously, three principal conceptual dichotomies are felt to hinder integrative efforts within the field. Thus, the proposed model will attempt to establish linkages between present and past determinants of behavior, between observable behavior and internal psychological events, and between individual psychopathology and interpersonal behavioral systems. Such minimal linkages are necessary for the responsible treatment of marital disorders.

Keywords

Interpersonal Behavior Cognitive Complexity Marital Adjustment Repertory Grid Marital Discord 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Taylor Segraves
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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