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Behavioral Marital Therapy

  • R. Taylor Segraves
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Behavioral marital therapy is one of the most recent entries into the field of marital therapy. Behavior therapists have begun to make significant contributions to the treatment of marital discord only in the last 10–15 years. This field really began in 1965 when Goldiamond pointed out how a husband controlled his wife’s behavior by stimuli he provided her. Thus, “If he wished his wife to behave differently to him, then he should provide other stimuli than the ones which produced the behavior he did not like” (Goldiamond, 1965, p. 856). Goldiamond’s pioneering work was soon followed by case reports by Lazarus in 1968 and by Stuart in 1969. Shortly thereafter, the behavioral marital therapy literature burgeoned with numerous case reports, literature reviews, and treatment program descriptions (Gurman and Knudson, 1978). The rapid acceptance of this new treatment approach is especially notable among recent graduates of clinical psychology programs in this country, although it has won some psychiatrists to its ranks (e.g., Liberman, 1975; Crowe, 1973; Stern and Marks, 1973). Part of the rapid growth in popularity of this approach is its appeal to professionals who feel that treatment approaches should be firmly linked to the terminology, if not the methodology, of the stricter psychological sciences.

Keywords

Discriminative Stimulus Operant Conditioning Positive Reinforcement Marital Discord Marital Distress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Taylor Segraves
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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