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Psychoanalytic Theory and Marriage

  • R. Taylor Segraves
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Of the major treatment orientations, psychoanalysis has shown the least interest in the study and treatment of marital discord. There is considerable ambivalence within that therapeutic community about the extent to which practitioners should be concerned with current interpersonal relationships of patients. Paradoxically, in spite of this ambivalence, psychoanalytic theory is probably the most influential contemporary theoretical system affecting the treatment of interpersonal difficulties. This is because of the pervasiveness of psychoanalytic concepts among mental health practitioners, particularly among psychiatrists and psychiatric social workers.

Keywords

Basic Book Marital Conflict Current Reality Psychoanalytic Theory Marital Discord 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Taylor Segraves
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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