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RES Structure and Function of the Reptilia

  • Vr. Muthukkaruppan
  • Myrin Borysenko
  • Rashika El Ridi

Abstract

A phylogenetic approach to understanding the development and mechanisms of immunity has gained attention only in recent years. On the evolutionary scale, reptiles are pivotal since they are the progenitors of both avian and mammalian classes. It is now agreed that the basic pattern of adaptive immune responsivity was established when the first vertebrates arose. However, this basic pattern has been constantly altered by evolutionary forces, and thus, the existing reptilian species possess a particular level of organization of their reticuloendothelial systems, much like other organ systems, such as the vascular systems, urogenital systems, nervous systems, etc. In this light, it is important to understand the structure and function of the reptilian immune systems. In particular, these ectothermic amniotes provide an organizational level which could help us to delineate the nature of the immune systems of endotherms. For example, the avian bursa of Fabricius, the generator of B lymphocytes, probably evolved from reptilian ancestors and its equivalent may still exist among living representatives. With the advent of immunohistochemical and in vitro techniques, structural and functional markers of reptilian lymphoid cells can now be identified and characterized. This review attempts to synthesize the existing literature concerning the structure and function of the reticuloendothelial systems of reptiles. Naturally, a major portion of this information has to do with the immune systems proper.

Keywords

Human Serum Albumin White Pulp Sheep Erythrocyte Skin Allograft Splenic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vr. Muthukkaruppan
    • 1
  • Myrin Borysenko
    • 2
  • Rashika El Ridi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyMadurai-Kamaraj UniversityMaduraiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, School of MedicineTufts UniversityBostonUSA
  3. 3.Zoology Department, Faculty of ScienceCairo UniversityCairoEgypt

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