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The Molecular Biology of Marek’s Disease Herpesvirus

  • Meihan Nonoyama
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens that was originally described by Marek (1907). A herpesvirus was isolated in cell cultures derived from tumors and from peripheral-blood lymphocytes (Churchill and Biggs, 1967; Solomon et al., 1968; Nazerian et al., 1968; Nazerian and Burmester, 1968), which implied that the virus is the causative agent of this disease (Churchill and Biggs, 1968; Witter et al., 1969). Although Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is generally found in the cell-associated form in tissue culture, cell-free virus is produced in the feather follicles of infected birds and released into the air (Calneck et al., 1970; Nazerian and Witter, 1970). Both cell-associated virus in infected cells and cell-free virus, extracted from the feather follicle, Can induce MD tumor in chickens by inoculation.

Keywords

Thymidine Kinase Lymphoblastoid Cell Line Sedimentation Coefficient Chick Embryo Fibroblast Feather Follicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meihan Nonoyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of VirologyShowa University Research Institute for Biomedicine in FloridaClearwaterUSA

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