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Intimacy pp 115-125 | Cite as

The Shared Experience

A Theory of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
  • Martin N. Fisher

Abstract

I would like to address myself first to the cornerstones of psychoanalytic inquiry, namely, anxiety, transference, and resistance. Specifically, the typical pattern is that under the impetus of anxiety, the individual often utilizes the transference in order to act out the resistance. In like fashion, we now know and understand that this experience of the patient is often met by the counteranxiety, the countertransference, and the counterresistance of the analyst. What then takes place in the arena of psychoanalysis is inextricably woven and interwoven in a combined interaction between patient and analyst. Who is influencing whom, at any given moment, in what direction, to what end, as a function of that interaction? This is what may be referred to as the psychology of “shared experience’” (Wolstein, 1971). I will return to this idea shortly.

Keywords

Shared Experience Report Card Emphasis Mine Authentic Person Basic Trust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin N. Fisher
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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