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Intimacy pp 79-97 | Cite as

Intimacy in Interpersonal Psychoanalysis

  • Joseph W. Newirth

Abstract

As a theoretical system, interpersonal psychoanalysis does not have the same formal structure as Freudian psychoanalysis or ego psychology. Interpersonal psychoanalysis can be conceptualized as an evolutionary, in contrast to an ideological, departure from the main stream of psychoanalytic thinking. This evolutionary movement was a function of three groups of factors: (a) the expansion of the explanatory framework of psychoanalysis beyond the biomechanical Freudian concepts to include anthropological, linguistic, sociological, and economic formulations; (b) the inclusion and concern with treatment for more disturbed patient populations, including the schizophrenic and those that would be considered narcissistic, schizoid, or borderline patients; and (c) a reaction against the increased emphasis on metapsychology and the formalized power structure of psychoanalysis. These evolutionary trends crystallized around the thoughts and activities of Harry Stack Sullivan, Erich Fromm, and Karen Horney, each of whom had a great deal of influence on developments in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. Interpersonal psychoanalysis can be thought of as a product of the works that have developed around the nuclei of Sullivan’s and Fromm’s contributions.

Keywords

Participant Observation Positive Mental Health Reconstructive Dynamic Interpersonal Theory Therapeutic Encounter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph W. Newirth
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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