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Intimacy pp 65-77 | Cite as

Self-Theory and Intimacy

  • Ernest S. Wolf

Abstract

When the editors of this volume first invited me to contribute an article on intimacy and the psychology of the self, I quickly and avidly consented because it seemed to me that the essence of any intimate relationship between people was to be found in the structure of the relation of a self and its selfobjects. Indeed, I have found no better way to elaborate a set of conceptualizations on the nature of intimacy than to attempt such explications within the framework of a psychology of the self. But I discovered, almost immediately, that the concept of intimacy is a rather illusive one. On the one hand some people use the word “intimacy” as a nice way of talking about sexual intercourse. On the other hand, the word “intimacy” has come to mean some vaguely desirable category of sincere friendship.

Keywords

Sexual Intercourse Subjective Experience Psychoanalytic Theory Standard Edition Spatial Metaphor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest S. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Chicago Institute for PsychoanalysisChicagoUSA

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