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Intimacy pp 53-64 | Cite as

Object Relations Theory and Intimacy

  • Jay S. Kwawer

Abstract

Object relations theory is a branch of psychoanalytic theory. Also known as “the English school,” its proponents include Klein, Fairbairn, Winnicott, and Guntrip, among others. It focuses attention on infancy as a stage of personality development, and on the infant’s relationship to mothering figures. Like interpersonal theory, it is concerned with modes of relatedness.

Keywords

Basic Book Object Relation Borderline Personality Disorder Intimate Relatedness Psychoanalytic Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay S. Kwawer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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