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Intimacy pp 39-51 | Cite as

Intimacy in Psychoanalysis

  • Robert Mendelsohn

Abstract

In a similar context (Billow & Mendelsohn, Chapter 23), I have defined intimacy as a cognitive state that relates to knowledge of one’s psychic reality. I have also suggested that one’s emotional attitude towards this knowledge is the affective component of intimacy. Whereas intimacy is thus an intrapsychic process, it is an interpersonal process as well. One must first be intimate with oneself before one can be intimate with others. Psychoanalysis is a technique in which the major goal is increasing knowledge of one’s psychic reality, that is, where the major goal is intimacy.

Keywords

Separation Anxiety Intimate Relation Depressed Person Standard Edition Transference Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Mendelsohn
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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