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Intimacy pp 347-369 | Cite as

Intimacy and the Psychotherapy of Adolescents

  • Nicholas Papouchis

Abstract

The concept of “intimacy” is a little-used one in the analytic literature. The Standard Edition (Freud, 1974) does not contain a single reference to the subject. There are only two citations to the subject in Grinstein’s (1960, 1966, 1975) “Index of Psychoanalytic Writings,” this in spite of the fact that clinicians regularly describe their patients as having problems with intimacy. The major references to the subject are to be found in Erikson (1968), who defines it as a “normative crisis” in the process of the development of identity, and in Sullivan (1953), who defines it in motivational terms as the “need for interpersonal intimacy.” It should be noted that these two major theoreticians place the special significance of this concept during that stage of life we call adolescence.

Keywords

Adolescent Psychiatry Young Adolescent Therapeutic Alliance Adolescent Patient Real Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Papouchis
    • 1
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, Brooklyn CenterLong Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

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