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Intimacy pp 21-38 | Cite as

Philosophical Approaches to Interpersonal Intimacy

  • Warren Wilner

Abstract

The existentialist philosopher, Gabriel Marcel, conveys the essence of intimacy as it will be developed in this essay; in addition, he indicates how this quality of experience may be differentiated from other experiential states.

Keywords

Intimate Relationship Philosophical Approach Partial Aspect Ontological Duality Intimate Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Warren Wilner
    • 1
  1. 1.New YorkUSA

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