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Emissions and Air Quality Relationships for Atmospheric Carbon Particles in Los Angeles

  • G. R. Cass
  • P. M. Boone
  • E. S. Macias

Abstract

An emission inventory for fine particle aerosol carbon has been constructed for the Metropolitan Los Angeles area and compared to the results of ambient sampling. Information on the level of source activity, total aerosol emission rate, particle size and chemical composition was used to estimate the mass emission rate of particulate organic and elemental carbon in this urban area. It was found that carbonaceous particle emissions to the atmosphere arise from more than fifty classes of mobile and stationary air pollution sources. Emission data for elemental carbon at present contain significant uncertainties. Methods for verifying the consistency of carbonaceous aerosol emission inventories thus are important. Verification tests based on comparison of the ratio of organic carbon to elemental carbon and lead in source emissions versus that measured in the atmosphere were developed in this paper. Using these tests, excellent agreement was found between the emission inventory and results of ambient sampling in Los Angeles during January and February 1980.

Keywords

Diesel Engine Emission Factor Elemental Carbon Emission Inventory Secondary Organic Aerosol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Cass
    • 1
  • P. M. Boone
    • 2
  • E. S. Macias
    • 2
  1. 1.California Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  2. 2.Washington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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