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The Regulation of Yeast Gene Expression by Multiple Control Elements

  • Terrance G. Cooper
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series

Abstract

The effective employment of biological systems for production of commercially useful chemicals often requires a thorough understanding of how the desired system is regulated. In the past we have looked to procaryotic systems for models of how control is exerted; they have served us well. However, it is becoming abundantly clear that the procaryotic paradigm does not extend to eucaryotic systems. For these, new models must be developed and new paradigms constructed. My purpose is the development of such a model in the simple eucaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This yeast is perhaps the oldest commercially cultured organism in existence. It is also one of the most well studied genetic systems available. Our model is the metabolism of two main nitrogen sources, allantoin and arginine. We selected two systems instead of one to gain some insight into the spectrum of regulatory mechanisms that operate in eucaryotic cells. Our choice also presents the added opportunity of assessing the means used to integrate the expression of separately controlled, but functionally related genes.

Keywords

Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Nitrogen Source Sole Nitrogen Source Ornithine Transaminase Ornithine Carbamoyl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terrance G. Cooper
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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