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Application and Comparison of Neutron Activation Analysis with Other Analytical Methods for the Analysis of Coal

  • R. A. Cahill
  • J. K. Frost
  • L. R. Camp
  • R. R. Ruch

Abstract

X-ray fluorescence, optical emission, atomic absorption, neutron activation, and standard ASTM chemical methods are used at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) to supply accurate and reliable data on the chemical composition of coal and coal-derived materials. Accuracy of the methods is demonstrated by examples from interlaboratory comparisons for many elements and by comparison of ISGS results with certified values and literature results from reference coal samples from the National Bureau of Standards.

Trace element mobility during coal pyrolysis, methods of coal beneficiation, chemical forms of elements in coal, and use of elemental distribution patterns to help interpret the geochemistry of the Illinois Basin coal fields are among the topics currently being investigated.

Keywords

Coal Seam Neutron Activation Analysis Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Coal Sample Standard Reference Mater 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Cahill
    • 1
  • J. K. Frost
    • 1
  • L. R. Camp
    • 1
  • R. R. Ruch
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois State Geological SurveyChampaignUSA

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