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Analysis of Oil Shale Products and Effluents Using a Multitechnique Approach

  • J. S. Fruchter
  • C. L. Wilkerson
  • J. C. Evans
  • R. W. Sanders

Abstract

Oil shale reserves of the Green River formation in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming have the potential to provide anywhere from 300 million to 2 trillion barrels of oil, depending on the various economic, technical and environmental assumptions made in the estimate. Even the lower very conservative figure amounts to more than five times the United States’ proved petroleum reserves, and moderate estimates of 600-800 billion barrels compare favorably with both the United States’ coal reserves and the entire world’s proved reserves of petroleum. Thus, if the technological, economic and political barriers to the production of shale oil can be overcome, oil shale could become an important source of precious liquid hydrocarbons.

Keywords

Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Multielement Analysis Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Elemental Mass Balance Error Weight Average 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Fruchter
    • 1
  • C. L. Wilkerson
    • 1
  • J. C. Evans
    • 1
  • R. W. Sanders
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific Northwest LaboratoryBattelle Memorial InstituteRichlandUSA

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