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Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles

  • John W. B. Hershey
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 41)

Abstract

Messenger RNA, from the time of its synthesis in the nucleus through its translation and degradation, does not exist as free RNA in animal cells but rather always appear to be complexed with proteins. Free cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles containing non-ribosomal RNA were discovered by Spirin and coworkers (1) in 1964 and were called informosomes. Shortly thereafter, similar particles containing hnRNA were identified in cell nuclei (2). Both kinds of mRNP particles are heterogeneous in size and are rich in protein, with RNA/protein mass ratios of about 1:3. mRNPs have been found in all eukaryotic organisms examined.

Keywords

Protein Synthesis Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell Active mRNA Globin mRNA Albumin mRNA 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. B. Hershey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological Chemistry, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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