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In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Potential Toxicity of Industrial Particles

  • Catherine Aranyi
  • Jeannie Bradof
  • Donald E. Gardner
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Alveolar macrophages (AM) protect the lungs by phagocytosis and digestion of inhaled irritant particles and infectious agents. Reduced activity of the AM system can impair the lung’s defensive capacity and increase susceptibility to respiratory disease. Since resistance to infection may be lowered by exposure to an inhalation hazard, changes in the major functional characteristics of AM can be used to monitor environmental stresses in the intact animal. In addition, since these cells can be obtained easily by tracheobronchial lavage and maintained in culture, they are frequently used in in vitro cellular toxicology to assess the potential inhalation hazard of various substances.

Keywords

Copper Smelter Aluminum Smelter Aerosol Exposure Inhalation Hazard Rabbit Alveolar Macrophage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Aranyi
    • 1
  • Jeannie Bradof
    • 1
  • Donald E. Gardner
    • 2
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
    • 2
  1. 1.Illinois Institute of Technology Research InstituteChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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