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Collection, Chemical Fractionation, and Mutagenicity Bioassay of Ambient Air Particulate

  • Alan Kolber
  • Thomas Wolff
  • Thomas Hughes
  • Edo Pellizzari
  • Charles Sparacino
  • Michael Waters
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
  • Larry Claxton
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Our industrial society has created thousands of synthetic xenobiotics to support our modern lifestyle. Many of these substances, and their by-products, enter our atmosphere in the form of vapor-phase and particulate pollutants that can be ingested by respiration and skin contact. The insults to human health and the ecosystem from these airborne organic pollutants are due mainly to polycyclic organic matter, specific industrial emissions such as halogenated hydrocarbons, and end-use chemicals such as pesticides (Fishbein, 1976). Polycyclic organics associated with air particulates are believed to result primarily from incomplete combustion of organic matter (Mø11er and Alfheim, 1980). These carcinogenic components, (benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P), benz(a) anthracene) and other polycyclics have been well characterized chemically (Shubik and Hartwell, 1969). As population and industrial activity increase, the growing health hazards associated with ambient air pollution must be further assessed and evaluated.

Keywords

Mutagenic Activity Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbon Linear Dose Response Phenyl Phenol Mutagenic Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Kolber
    • 1
  • Thomas Wolff
    • 1
  • Thomas Hughes
    • 1
  • Edo Pellizzari
    • 1
  • Charles Sparacino
    • 1
  • Michael Waters
    • 2
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
    • 2
  • Larry Claxton
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Triangle InstituteResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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