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A Preliminary Study of the Clastogenic Effects of Diesel Exhaust Fumes Using the Tradescantia Micronucleus Bioassay

  • Te-Hsiu Ma
  • A. Van Anderson
  • Shahbeg S. Sandhu
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Automobile engine emissions are one of the major urban air pollutants in the industrialized nations. The direct and indirect effects of these complex agents on human health are crucial problems for modern society. Epidemiological studies carried out in Europe (Barth and Blacker, 1978; Blumer et al., 1977a, b) and Japan (Shimizu et al., 1977) found that cancer mortality rates were higher in populations near heavily travelled highways than in those away from them. The increasing popularity of diesel-engine-powered vehicles, especially passenger cars, demands a better understanding of the health effects of diesel emissions.

Keywords

Diesel Exhaust Pollen Mother Cell Diesel Exhaust Particulate Driving Cycle Maleic Hydrazide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Te-Hsiu Ma
    • 1
  • A. Van Anderson
    • 1
  • Shahbeg S. Sandhu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences and Institute for Environmental ManagementWestern Illinois UniversityMacombUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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