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Mutagenic Effects of Environmental Particulates in the CHO/HGPRT System

  • John D. Shelburne
  • G. M. ChescheirIII
  • Neil E. Garrett
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
  • Michael D. Waters
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

The emission of particulate matter into the atmosphere from stationary fuel combustion and transportation-related sources is a serious environmental problem. Natusch (1978) has shown that trace elements and chemicals associated with particulate matter from coal combustion may constitute a health hazard. In an earlier study, Natusch and Wallace (1974) reported that many known or potential carcinogens are preferentially concentrated on the surface of respirable coal fly ash. According to Davison et al. (1974), greater quantities of trace elements are associated with particles of fly ash too small to be trapped effectively by conventional particulate-control devices. The potential hazard of respirable particles was brought into sharper focus through studies in which organic extracts of fly ash particles (Chrisp et al., 1978; Fisher et al., 1979) and diesel exhaust particulates (Huisingh et al., 1978) were shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium.

Keywords

Diesel Engine Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Mutation Frequency Coal Combustion Diesel Exhaust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Shelburne
    • 1
  • G. M. ChescheirIII
    • 2
  • Neil E. Garrett
    • 2
  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
    • 3
  • Michael D. Waters
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyDuke University Medical Center and Veterans Administration HospitalDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research ProgramNorthrop Services, Inc.Research Triangle ParkUSA
  3. 3.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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