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Bacterial Mutagenesis and the Evaluation of Mobile-Source Emissions

  • Larry Claxton
  • Mike Kohan
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Interest in developing a rapid, inexpensive means of detecting and evaluating the potential health hazards of mobile-source emissions is increasing. Faced with the staggering numbers of chemicals created through combustion processes that have never been assayed for mutagenicity and/or carcinogenicity, the chemist faces a futile task of identifying and controlling all potential health hazards. This study will demonstrate how bioassay techniques, and particularly the Salmonella assay, can be coupled with the fractionation of chemically complex emissions to identify components requiring more extensive analysis and control.

Keywords

Linear Regression Line Mobile Source Diesel Vehicle Strain TA100 Research Triangle Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Claxton
    • 1
  • Mike Kohan
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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