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Bioassay of Particulate Organic Matter from Ambient Air

  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

The influence of industrialization and consequent increased concentration of urban particulate matter on the incidence of cancer has long been a concern (Kotin and Falk, 1963; Carnow and Meier, 1973). The first bioassays used to evaluate complex ambient air samples were whole-animal carcinogenesis bioassays (Leiteret al., 1942; Hueper et al., 1962). In these studies, organic extracts of urban particulate matter were found to be carcinogenic in rodents. Such organic extracts have also been shown to transform rodent embryo cells in culture (Freeman et al., 1971; Gordon et al., 1973). Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), such as benzo(a)pyrene, were detected in these extracts; however, these compounds did not account for all of the carcinogenic activity reported.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Environmental Protection Agency Particulate Organic Matter Mutagenic Activity Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joellen Lewtas Huisingh
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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