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Potential Utility of Plant Test Systems for Environmental Monitoring: An Overview

  • Shahbeg Sandhu
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Research over the past decade has shown a significant proportion of genetic diseases in man to be caused by natural and man-made chemical mutagens. Human cancer is one of the diseases for which direct associations with certain environmental factors have been established (such as the association between cigarette smoking and lung carcinoma). The recently published “Atlas of Cancer Mortality” (Mason et al., 1975) provides further evidence for the association between human cancer and environmental factors. In this study, certain specific types of cancer appear to be associated with certain industrial activities. Chemical mutagens are also believed to contribute to birth defects, behavioral abnormalities, and aging. It has been suggested that environmental chemicals play a role in causing atherosclerosis (Benditt, 1973) and, most damaging of all, in deteriorating the human gene pool.

Keywords

Maleic Hydrazide Methylmethane Sulfonate Plant Bioassay Ethylene Dibromide Germ Cell Mutation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shahbeg Sandhu
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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