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Aqueous Effluent Concentration for Application to Biotest Systems

  • William D. Ross
  • William J. Hillan
  • Mark T. Wininger
  • JoAnne Gridley
  • Lan Fong Lee
  • Richard J. Hare
  • Shahbeg S. Sandhu
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Potential chemical mutagens in industrial effluents may be present at concentrations below the detection limits of biotests such as the Ames mutagenicity test. These chemicals may accumulate in biological food chains. Many insecticides and other chemicals are known to accumulate in living organisms where tissues act as effective storage depots for toxic compounds (Loomis, 1978). This effect is especially significant for human health when dilute toxicants enter the human food chain, such as through seafoods. Mollusks such as the oyster tend to accumulate toxicants, because they filter-feed, which concentrates and magnifies the effects of toxic materials. Because of this potential for bioaccumulation, methods are needed to determine the bioactivity of low concentrations of potential toxicants in industrial effluents.

Keywords

Total Organic Carbon Reverse Osmosis Effluent Sample Acridine Orange Desorption Efficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • William D. Ross
    • 1
  • William J. Hillan
    • 1
  • Mark T. Wininger
    • 1
  • JoAnne Gridley
    • 1
  • Lan Fong Lee
    • 1
  • Richard J. Hare
    • 1
  • Shahbeg S. Sandhu
    • 2
  1. 1.Monsanto Research CorporationDaytonUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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