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The Initiating and Promoting Activity of Chemicals Isolated from Drinking Waters in the Sencar Mouse: A Five-City Survey

  • Merrel Robinson
  • John W. Glass
  • David Cmehil
  • Richard J. Bull
  • John G. Orthoefor
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 22)

Abstract

Means of properly evaluating the carcinogenic risk posed by organics in drinking water are of utmost concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While rodent lifetime exposure and human epidemiological studies serve as the only generally accepted means, the cost and time involved are highly prohibitive. In addition, formulation of human epidemiological data requires human exposure of sufficient magnitude to allow separation of confounding factors from the relationship in question. Since a major part of EPA’s regulatory activities is directed towards preventing significant increases in the carcinogenic risk to the population, quick and reliable investigative methodology is a necessity. Short-term bioassays can be used to identify most potential problems and to provide an initial risk assessment.

Keywords

Drinking Water Phorbol Myristate Acetate Carcinogenic Risk Phorbol Myristate Acetate Human Epidemiological Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merrel Robinson
    • 1
  • John W. Glass
    • 1
  • David Cmehil
    • 1
  • Richard J. Bull
    • 1
  • John G. Orthoefor
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyCincinnatiUSA

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