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Effects of Staphylococcal Cell Wall Products on Immunity

  • Roman Dziarski

Abstract

A number of bacterial products from a variety of bacteria can affect a host’s immunity by modulating its specific immune response and/or nonspecific resistance mechanisms. Staphylococcus aureus is a particularly good model for such studies, as it is a very ubiquitous microorganism present as normal flora on the mucous membranes and skin of man and animals, yet it is capable of causing serious infections in almost every part of the body. Staphylococcal cell wall is one of the important virulence factors of this microorganism, facilitating establishment and persistence of an infection (26, 36, 41–44, 70, 77, 78, 120, 121, 123, 167, 174, 176). Furthermore, even if the host’s bactericidal mechanisms are efficient, staphylococcal cells or cell wall fragments can persist undegraded in the host’s tissues for a long period of time (36, 48). It is conceivable that at both of these stages staphylococcal cell wall products can modulate the immunity of the host.

Keywords

Staphylococcus Aureus Spleen Cell Mitogenic Activity Teichoic Acid Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman Dziarski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and PathologyPennsylvania College of Podiatric MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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