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Specificity of Suppressor T Cells Activated During the Immune Response to Type III Pneumococcal Polysaccharide

  • P. J. Baker
  • P. W. Stashak
  • D. F. Amsbaugh
  • B. Prescott

Abstract

Prior treatment (priming) with a single sub-immunogenic dose of Type III pneumococcal polysaccharide (SSS-III) greatly reduces the capacity of mice to make an antibody response to an optimally immunogenic dose of SSS-III; such unresponsiveness (low-dose paralysis) persists for several months after priming and is mediated by thymus-derived (T) suppressor cells. Priming with SSS-III does not influence the magnitude of the antibody response to serologically unrelated antigens, with or without immunization with SSS-III; furthermore, priming does not alter the TNP-specific antibody response of mice immunized with TNP11-SS-III. Thus, the phenomenon of low- dose paralysis is highly antigen-specific with respect to both its induction and expression. Although the suppression noted in mice treated with Concanavalin A (Con A) is similar in degree and kinetics for expression to that found after the induction of low-dose paralysis, Con A-induced suppression is not antigen-specific. This suggests that a non-specific product released from activated T cells may be responsible for causing both types of suppressive effects; but, in the case of low-dose paralysis, a mechanism exists for focusing the effects of this product on a selected subpopulation (clone) of anti- body-forming cells.

Keywords

Antibody Response Single Injection Leuconostoc Mesenteroides Sodium Metaperiodate Benzene Sulfonic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Baker
    • 1
  • P. W. Stashak
    • 1
  • D. F. Amsbaugh
    • 1
  • B. Prescott
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Microbial ImmunityNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Biomedical Research InstituteRockvilleUSA

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