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Immunostimulation by LPS and Its Derivatives

  • U. H. Behling
  • A. Nowotny

Abstract

Of the vast number of biological properties attributed to endotoxins, their unique capacity to stimulate the body’s natural defenses in an immunologically non-specific way is unquestionably their most important property. That the effect of endotoxin on the immune system is not a singular, well-defined interaction becomes obvious from studies in vivo and in vitro. The non-specific effects of endotoxin upon resistance to various pathogens have been reported by many investigators (7, 18, 26, 44) and are attributed to many different cellular and non-cellular mechanisms (3). Alterations of the hemopoietic system include an early appearance of leukopenia followed several hours later by marked leukocytosis (20, 25). The histological picture of the bone marrow, spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes also follows a bi-phasic response which is initially characterized by intensely degenerative-appearing tissue, hypocellularity and loss in size and weight. Within 24 to 48 hours, cell-rich foci appear, giving rise to hyperplasia several days thereafter (44, 20, 50). This is the result of increased production of granulocytes, lymphocytes, myelocytes, and macrophages. Functional changes are also evident during this time.

Keywords

Boron Trifluoride Immune Enhancement Polysaccharide Moiety Potassium Methylate Endotoxic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. H. Behling
    • 1
  • A. Nowotny
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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