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Stress Reduction in the Family

Improving Communication
  • Martin Shaffer

Abstract

Understanding how to overcome stress on the job is important, but there is also another area of our lives in which stress often plays a crucial role. Indeed, for many the tensions and stresses produced within the family can be just as strong as, if not stronger than, those produced at work. In fact, family problems often spill over into the workplace, creating stressful situations that neither job pacing nor creation of a more positive atmosphere at work can overcome.

Keywords

Family Member Heart Attack Emotional Support Stress Reduction Family Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martin Shaffer 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Shaffer

There are no affiliations available

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